Storytelling solutions for those who work with young children

Bread

1:Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme   4: Activity


The Fairy Bread Man

One day Grandma was making fairy bread for her grandchildren. They loved fairy bread. Grandma spread the butter on the pieces of bread and pressed the bread onto a plate of hundreds and thousands. Then she cut the colourful bread up into triangles just the way the children like them. She decided to make special fairy bread for herself. Instead of cutting the bread with a knife she used a cutter in the shape of a little man and she made a fairy bread man. With the hundreds and thousands all over his body he was a very colourful fairy bread man. Then Grandma piped on some icing to give him two eyes, a nose and a mouth. He looked so real she thought he might get up and walk. And that’s just what he did.

He jumped up off the table and yelled. “You’re not going to eat me you greedy old woman.”

Grandma got a fright. But she grabbed her rolling pin and ran after Fairy Bread Man.
“Who are you calling a greedy old woman?” she yelled.

Fairy Bread Man said:
Greedy old woman, greedy old woman.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me, I’m the fairy bread man.

Grandma ran after him, waving her rolling pin in the air.
“You come back here. Don’t you dare disappear.”

Grandma ran as fast as she could but she couldn’t catch him.

Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Wombat heard Fairy Bread Man singing.

“I love fairy bread,” said Wombat. “I’m sick of eating grass. Come back here Fairy Bread Man.”

Fairy Bread Man laughed:
I can run away from you, Wombat,
I can run as fast as a panther cat.
Run, run as fast as you can,
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Wombat ran as fast as he could but he couldn’t catch him.

Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Emu heard Fairy Bread Man singing.

“I love fairy bread,” said Emu. “I’m sick of eating seeds. Come back here Fairy Bread Man.”

Fairy Bread Man laughed:
I can run away from you, Emu.
Even if you flew, I could run away from you.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Emu ran as fast as she could but she couldn’t catch him. Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Kangaroo heard Fairy Bread Man singing.

“I love fairy bread,” said Kangaroo. “I’m sick of eating plants. Come back here Fairy Bread Man.”

Fairy Bread Man laughed:
I can run away from you, Kangaroo.
I can run away from a zoo if I want to.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Kangaroo hopped as fast as he could but he couldn’t catch him.

Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

By now Fairy Bread Man thought he was very clever. He was sure he could run faster than anything on land. He skipped through the bush singing his song.

When he saw a dingo resting under a tree he stopped and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

The dingo took no notice. In fact it looked like the dingo did not even hear Fairy Bread Man.

Fairy Bread Man sang a little louder.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

Still the dingo took no notice.

Fairy Bread Man went a little closer to the dingo and sang again:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

Still the dingo took no notice.

Finally, Fairy Bread Man went right up to the dingo and sang into his ear:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m…

But before he could finish his cheeky song – SNAP! The dingo ate him up in one bite. There was not a single crumb left over.

An original story by JB Rowley  inspired by The Gingerbread Man. Free for others to use except for commercial publication.

Song: Bread and Butter Song

Rhyme: Slice, Slice

Slice, slice, the bread looks nice.
(Using side of hand, rub sideways on child’s tummy.)
Spread, spread butter on the bread.
(Use palm of hand to rub child’s tummy.)
Jam on top makes it sweet.
(Kiss child’s tummy.)
Now it’s good for me to eat.
(Tickle child’s tummy.)

Activity: Make Fairy Bread

What you need:
Slices of white sandwich bread
Butter/margarine at room temperature
Multi-coloured hundred and thousands

Procedure:
Spread the slices of bread evenly with butter.
Cut the bread into triangles or use a cutter to make different shapes (without the crusts). (Children love doing this bit.)
Place the hundreds and thousands on a plate.
Press the bread butter side down into the hundreds and thousands to coat the bread.
Enjoy.

Posted by JB Rowley: teller of stories, writer of books and teacher of English.

 

Dinosaurs

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity


The Last Dinosaur
Long, long ago instead of people, huge dinosaurs roamed the earth. As time went by their numbers became less and less until finally there was just one dinosaur left in the whole wide world.

He was a handsome green dinosaur, with a magnificent red tail. He lived all alone on an island. He was very lonely because there were no other dinosaurs to play with and none of the other animals would play with him. They were scared of him. Every day, just to fill in time he would walk down through the hills, down to the ocean and sit on a huge rock. He looked down through the clear blue water and watched the ocean creatures.

One day as he sat there looking down he saw a beautiful pink octopus! She had big blue eyes and eight beautiful legs! Red Tail fell in love instantly! He gazed down at the beautiful pink octopus and she looked up at him and….fluttered her eyelashes at him.

Day after day, hour after hour they gazed at each other through the water. Red Tail wanted very much to be with her but he could not get into the water to live and the octopus could not live on the land with him. He was very sad.

One day as he was walking down through the hills he stopped for a moment to try to think of a way that they could be together. As he stood there thinking, he heard a tiny voice.

“Help. Help.”

He looked around but he could see no one.

“Help. Help.”

It seemed to be coming out of the ground. He looked down but all he could see was mud. It had been raining all night and the earth was soft and squelchy and muddy. Then he heard it again.

“Help. Help.”

Then the mud moved. There was something stuck in the mud! Red Tail swung his magnificent tail into the mud so that the muddy thing could climb out. The he strode to the nearest pool of water and swished his tail into the water so that the muddy thing could wash itself. As the mud fell away he saw a pretty, pretty white fairy with a glistening white wand!

“Thank you, Red Tail,” said the white fairy. “You are a great and powerful beast, yet you have saved a tiny, helpless creature like me. For that I would like to grant you your dearest wish. What is the one thing in the world you would like? Just name it and it shall be yours!”

“Oh, that’s easy,” said Red Tail, in a booming voice. “The one thing in the world I want is to be an octopus.”

“Oh!” said the white fairy. “Are you sure? You know as a dinosaur you have great power and need never be frightened of anyone. But as an octopus, well….an octopus is just an octopus you know.”

“Oh, I know,” boomed Red Tail. “But it’s no fun being a great and powerful beast when there are no other beasts to play with. Oh, no. I know I’d much rather be an octopus.”

“Very well,” said the white fairy. She touched his magnificent red tail with her glistening wand and… Piiiiiing! Red Tail disappeared!

The beautiful white fairy flew over to the ocean. She looked down into the clear blue water and saw the pink octopus swimming around the rocks with a happy smile on her face. Then she saw a handsome green octopus, with eight red legs, swimming behind her. They looked so happy together.

And that is what happened to the last dinosaur left on the earth.

An original story by JB Rowley free for others to use except for commercial publication.

 

Dinosaur Song

 

Rhyme: What Do You Think I Saw?

Down by the ocean an egg cracked open
What do you think I saw?
A big floppy head and a tongue so red
A neck so long and a body so strong
Four funny limbs and a tail that swings.
What do you think I saw?
Yes! A dinosaur!

 

Dorothy Dinosaur Craft

 

Deep Sea Dreaming

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity
 

Ocean Creatures

One day when I was a very little girl I went to the beach with my mummy and daddy. I went into the ocean for a swim. While I was swimming along came an ocean creature to swim with me. It was a green sea turtle. So I swam with the turtle.

Then along came another ocean creature. It was a seahorse. So I swam with the turtle and the seahorse.

Then along came another ocean creature. It was a clown fish. So I swam with the turtle, the seahorse and the clown fish.

Then along came another ocean creature. It was a dugong. So I swam with the turtle, the sea horse, the clown fish and the dugong.

Then along came another ocean creature. It was a big hungry whale.

The hungry whale swam toward the turtle and the turtle swam away fast.

The hungry whale swam toward the seahorse and the seahorse swam away fast.

The hungry whale swam toward the clown fish and the clown fish swam away fast.

The hungry whale swam toward the dugong and the dugong away fast.

The hungry whale swam toward me and I was so frightened I screamed very loudly and I splashed and splashed in the water. The big hungry whale swam away.

I went back to the sand where Mummy and Daddy were looking for me. They told me I must never ever go into the water on my own again. Never ever!

Choose your own ocean creatures to use in the story. I tell this as an apron story, using colourful cardboard cut-outs. Each creature appears out of one of my apron pockets when I introduce it in the story and sticks to mu apron (with the help of Velcro).

An original story by JB Rowley. Free for use by others except commercial publication.
 
 

Song: My Bonnie Lies over the Ocean
 
This song is great to use as a warm up activity and a closing activity. Hug your child and rock with the rhythm of the song.
 

Rhyme: Little Turtle

There was a little turtle (Make fist like turtle)
That lived in the sea (Draw waves in the air)

He snapped at a jelly fish (Make snapping motion at child)
And he snapped at me (Make snapping motion at self)

He caught the little jelly fish (Tickle child)
But he didn’t catch me! (Hug child)
 
 

Craft: Enchanted Learning

Lots of different activities to choose from here.

 

Teddy Bears

1: Story 2: Song  3: Rhyme 4: Activity


Teddy Bears’ Picnic

One day four teddy bears went to Teddy Bear Park to have a picnic. There was Tall Ted, Twiggy Teddy, Tubby Teddy, and Tiny Teddy.

Tiny Teddy’s mummy had already prepared their picnic. There was a picnic table with a bright yellow tablecloth. On the table were four pots of honey.

Before they had their honey, the teddies wanted to play in the teddy playground, all except Tiny Teddy. It was his first picnic and he was so excited to see the round pots of honey. Tiny Teddy loved honey. He started to eat all the honey in the pots. He ate 1…2…3…4… pots of honey. Now his fur was all sticky and he was very tired so he fell asleep under the table . Just then the other teddies finished playing and ran over to have their picnic.

Tall Ted said, “Someone has been eating my honey.”

Twiggy Teddy said, “Someone has been eating my honey, too.”

Tubby Teddy said, “Someone has been eating my honey and it’s all gone!”

Underneath the table Tiny Teddy woke up and heard what they said. He realised what he had done was wrong. He crawled out from under the table all covered in honey.

“I’m sorry,” he said.

“Tiny Teddy!” yelled the other teddies all together.

Tiny Teddy ran as fast as he could all the way to the bottom of the garden and hid in the bushes. He thought all the other teddies would be angry with him and hurt him. But they didn’t. Tall Ted, Twiggy Teddy, Tubby Teddy were sad that they did not have any honey to eat but they did not hurt Tiny Teddy because they knew he had just made a mistake.

“Everybody makes mistakes,” said Tall Ted. He remembered the time he lost one of Twiggy Teddy’s favourite books.

“Yes, everybody makes mistakes,” said Twiggy Teddy. She remembered the time she trod on Tubby Teddy’s toe and hurt him.

“That’s right, everybody makes mistakes,” said Tubby Teddy. He remembered the time he broke Tiny Teddy’s favourite cup.

So they called out to Tiny Teddy. “Come back, Tiny Teddy. We love you.”

Tiny Teddy crept out of the bushes. He looked very funny because his body was covered in leaves which had stuck to the honey on his fur. He looked like a leafy teddy monster! He looked so funny that Tall Ted, Twiggy Teddy and Tubby Teddy laughed. Then they all gave him a big bear hug. Now they were all covered in honey and leaves as well. All the teddies laughed at each other looking so funny.

Later, Tiny Teddy took them to his house and his mummy gave Tall Ted, Twiggy Teddy and Tubby Teddy a pot of honey each.

And now you know what to do if somebody makes a mistake: just give them a bear hug!

This story was brought to you by JB Rowley :teller of stories, writer of books and teacher of English

Song: Teddy Bear’s Picnic

 


Rhyme:

Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch the ground.
Teddy bear, teddy bear, turn around.
Teddy bear, teddy bear, show your shoe.
Teddy bear, teddy bear, that will do.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, run upstairs.
Teddy bear, teddy bear, say your prayers.
Teddy bear, teddy bear, turn off the light.
Teddy bear, teddy bear, say goodnight.

 


Activity: Make Tiny Teddy

Australia

1:Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

Tiddalick the thirsty sand frog.

Long ago in Australia there was a thirsty sand frog called Tiddalick. Tiddalick had a special trick. He could keep extra water in his belly.

One day Tiddalick was very thirsty. He drank the water of the nearest river until it there was not a drop of water left. He hopped across the land, looking for more water to drink. He drank up all the water from the billabongs, lakes, streams and creeks until there was no more water left in all of the land.

The animals were upset. They were thirsty too and there was no water left for them to drink. Tiddalick had it all in his swollen stomach. The animals held a meeting. All the animals were at the meeting: the kangaroos, the wallabies, the echidnas, the kookaburras, the snakes, the wombats, the pygmy possums, the koalas, and all their friends. They decided that the only way for them to get a drink was to somehow get it back from Tiddalick. Wombat said they should get the water back without hurting Tiddalick because after all he had just made a mistake and we all make mistakes.

“We must make him laugh”, said the kookaburra. “If we can do that, he will have to hold his hands against his sides and the water will pour out of his mouth.”

Kookaburra perched on a branch close to Tiddalick’s head and laughed and laughed until he could laugh no more. Tiddalick did not even smile.

The other animals tried all sorts of ways to make Tiddalick laugh. Some of them danced and turned somersaults and some told jokes.  Tiddalick did not even smile.

Finally the animals decided the best way to make Tiddalick laugh was to tickle him. Wombat reminded them to tickle Tiddalick very gently because they should not hurt Tiddalick. So one by one the animals began to tickle Tiddalick’s tummy.

A tiny smile began to creep slowly over Tiddalick’s face. His smile became bigger and bigger and water came out of his mouth.  Deep rumbles of laughter made Tiddalick’s big swollen belly shake. Soon he was laughing so much that he put his hands to his sides and rocked to and fro. His mouth opened wide and a great smooth tide of water came gushing out. The water flowed back into the rivers, the streams, the creeks and the  billabongs.

Tiddalick knew he had been greedy and he ran away in case the other animals tried to hurt him. But the other animals remembered what Wombat said. Tiddalick had just made a mistake and they did not want to hurt him. But if you go out into the desert today you will not find Tiddalick because he still runs away and hides in the sand whenever he hears anyone coming.

An Aboriginal Dreamtime story retold by JB Rowley: teller of stories, writer of books and teacher of English.

Song: Five Speckled Frogs

Five little speckled frogs sat on a great big log
Eating the most delicious bugs — YUM YUM!
One jumped into the pool where it was nice and cool
Now there are four speckled frogs. GLUG! GLUG!


Rhyme: Tiddalick Chant

Tiddalick drank, Tiddalick drank; Tiddalick drank all day long
Water from the creek, water from the billabong.
Tiddalick drank all day long



Activity: Frog Puppet
 

Winter

Storytelling program for young children: Seasons – Winter

1:Story 2:Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

Story: The Fire That Would Not Burn

Long, long ago there was a castle on a big green hill. In the castle a huge warm fire burned to keep everyone warm. The fire had burned for years and had never gone out. In those days the only way people could warm their houses was by having a fire in the house and because the castle was so big they had to have a big fire.

One cold, cold winter snow fell everywhere. Snow made the castle white. Snow made the big hill white. Long cold icicles hung from the turrets of the castle. Inside the castle the air was chilly. The walls were cold. The floors were cold. People started blowing on their hands and jumping up and down on the spot to try to get warm. Alas, no-one could get the fire going again. The cook piled more logs on the fire but it remained black and cold. The king used the big castle bellows to blow on the fire but it remained dark and cold.

Finally the king ordered a servant to go down the hill into the village to ask for some red hot coals from anyone who had a fire burning in their house. So the servant put on a big coat, and with a great iron lantern and a coal bucket went out into the cold. As he trudged through the snow the freezing wind made his nose red with cold. Icicles formed on his eyebrows.

“A light for the castle fire!” he called as he went. “Who will give me coals to light the castle fire?”

A man came out of a small house carrying bright red coals on a shovel and emptied them into the coal bucket. “Mind you bring me back some gold pieces in return,” he said.

The king’s servant started back to the castle, bending his body against the cold wind and snow. He had gone only a few steps, though, when he saw that the coals had turned cold and grey. He threw them away and turned back toward the village again.

“A light for the castle fire!” he called as he went. “Who will give coals with to light the castle fire?”

A woman came out of a brightly lit house and invited the servant in to take red hot coals from her fire for the castle. “Mind you bring me back some gold pieces in return,” she said.

The king’s servant started back to the castle, bending his body against the cold wind and snow.

 He had gone only a few steps, though, when he saw that the coals had turned cold and grey. He threw them away and turned back toward the village once more. This went on time after time. Every time someone gave him red hot coals they asked for gold pieces in return but the coals died away before the servant could get back to the castle.

At last the king’s servant came to a small tumbledown cottage at the edge of the village. Snow covered the path to the door. The wind blew down through the old chimney. Jack Frost had crept in through the cracks in the wall. The door opened at once when the messenger knocked. There was only one person inside; a small girl stirring porridge over a small fire.

“You may have as many coals as you like,” she said. She explained that she was cooking a nice hot supper for her father when he got home from work. “Please sit down and warm yourself, and have a bowl of warm porridge before you start out in the cold again. Then you may have half of our fire for the castle fire.”

The king’s messenger was glad to have some warm food in his body and very pleased to rest in the warmth of the little cottage. When it was time to go, he did not like to take half the fire so he simply lifted one bright red coal from the fire and placed it in the coal bucket and once more headed back toward the castle.

He was afraid the hot coal would go cold before he got back to the castle. To his amazement the small red coal grew brighter with each step. When he arrived back at the castle, the coal still burned and glowed. As soon as the small red coal touched the cold logs in the fireplace they burst into flames. In no time at flames licked around the logs and the fire sent its warmth through the castle. The fire was bigger and warmer than it had ever been before.

The king and queen were astonished. They questioned the messenger and heard how many people had offered him coals but demanded gold in return but each red coal had gone cold before he had taken a few steps.

“What did the girl in the cottage ask for?” said the queen.

“Nothing at all,” said the messenger. “Not only that, but she gave me hot food to eat.”

“Ah,” said the queen. “She gave freely with care in her heart. That is why our fire is so warm.”

An old folktale retold by JB Rowley.

 Rain, Rain, Go Away

Rhyme: It’s Raining; It’s Pouring

It’s raining; it’s pouring.
The old man is snoring.
He went to bed and bumped his head,
And he couldn’t get up in the morning.

Activity

Make a paper plate snowman.

Limericks and Rhymes

Story 1: Limerick Lenny   Story 2: The Grasshopper Rap

Limerick Lenny: (Adapted from Pete Seeger’s Abiyoyo)

Once upon a time there was a little boy called Lenny and he loved limericks. His father taught him how to make a limerick.

“Limericks have five lines,” said his father.

“And all the lines rhyme?” said Lenny.

“Sort of,” said his father. “ Lines 1,2 and 5 rhyme with each other and lines 3 & 4 rhyme with each other like this:

There once was a boy called Lenny
Who had a girlfriend called Penny

Lenny said, “I’m too young to have a girlfriend.”

His father said,”I know. This is just a silly nonsense poem.” His father started again:

There once was a boy called Lenny
Who had a girlfriend called Penny
But one fine day
She moved house and went away
Now Lenny cries tears so many

Lenny thought he could do a better limerick than that so he said:

There once was a dad
Who was ever so bad.
He always said silly stuff
Till his son had enough
And went to live in Trinidad
.

After that, Lenny loved making up limericks. Whenever he met a friend, he made a limerick with the friend’s name in it. When he met his friend Tim, he said:

There once was a boy named Tim
Who went to the river to swim.
He fell off a rock
Right next to a croc
And that was the end of him.

When he met his friend Paul, he said:

There was a boy named Paul,
Who went to a fancy dress ball;
He dressed as a pork chop
From the butcher shop
And was eaten by a dog in the hall.


When he met his friend Sue, he said:


There was a young girl called Sue
Who dreamt she was eating her shoe.
She woke in the night,
With a terrible fright,
And found it was perfectly true
.

Well, his friends got sick of Lenny’s limericks and told him they were boring and he should stop. They didn’t want to play with him anymore and they didn’t invite him to their parties.

Now in this town the people used to tell stories about the old days and they used to tell a story about a giant called Abiyoyo. The giant was as tall as a house and could eat a person whole. It was just a story. Nobody believed that old story. But one day a great big shadow blocked the sun’s light. The ground shook. Down from the mountains came the giant. His big steps sounded like thunder. Women screamed and men fainted.

“Run for your lives!” they yelled, “Abiyoyo’s coming.”

But Lenny didn’t notice all this. He had gone to play by himself in the park. He was so busy making up limericks he did not realise the giant was coming until suddenly there it was in front of him.

Abiyoyo had long fingernails because he never cut them. He had green fur growing on his teeth because he never cleaned them. He had potatoes growing out of his ears because he never cleaned them. His hair was all knotted and matted because he never brushed it. He had feet that were stinking because he never washed them.

Abiyoyo reached down with big claws toward Lenny. Lenny was so frightened he just started to do what came naturally to him. He made up a limerick.

There once was a giant named Abiyoyo

Now, when the giant heard his name he stopped and listened.

Lenny started again:

There once was a giant named Abiyoyo
Who loved to walk on tippy toe, toe
One day he stomped on the ground
And frightened the whole town
But all he wanted was to say hellolo
Abiyoyo laughed. Lenny laughed too.

Abiyoyo said; “Hello, hello, hello. My name is Abiyoyo.”

After that the giant walked on tippy toe so that the people would not be frightened and Lenny’s friends decided they liked his limericks.

The End.

The Grasshopper Rap

(Adapted from Papa Joe’s version of The Ants and the Grasshopper.)

Once upon a time, a long, long time ago, far, far away, there was an ant hill. In the ant hill were ants. Lots of ants. Old ants, middle aged ants and young ants. In the spring and summer and autumn those ants had to get up very early in the morning. And after breakfast, they had to gather food for winter.

They had to dig the food up, pick the food up and then stack it up. The young ants thought this was BORING. Then one day they heard some music and then they heard this:

Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I
Dig it up, dig it up, dig it up,
Pick it up, pick it up, pick it up,
Stack it up, stack it up, stack it up,
Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I Vo

It was a grasshopper playing his fiddle. The young ants loved it.

They said, “Grasshopper, stay here and play for us. We’ll give you some lunch.”

Well, that was fine with the grasshopper. So he played and the ants danced and sang while they worked.

Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I
Dig it up, dig it up, dig it up,
Pick it up, pick it up, pick it up,
Stack it up, stack it up, stack it up,
Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I Vo

The young ants enjoyed the music so much they worked twice as fast.

Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I
Dig it up, dig it up, dig it up,
Pick it up, pick it up, pick it up,
Stack it up, stack it up, stack it up,
Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I Vo

They had their work done In half the time. The ants gave the Grasshopper lunch and said:”Grasshopper, play for us again tomorrow. We’ll give you breakfast in the morning.”

Well, that was fine with the grasshopper. So the next day he played and the ants danced and sang as they worked.

Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I
Dig it up, dig it up, dig it up,
Pick it up, pick it up, pick it up,
Stack it up, stack it up, stack it up,
Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I Vo

They worked so fast they had time left over to play. Of course, the ants asked the grasshopper to come back the next day. Well, that was fine with the grasshopper. So the next day he played and the ants danced and sang.

Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I
Dig it up, dig it up, dig it up,
Pick it up, pick it up, pick it up,
Stack it up, stack it up, stack it up,
Vittle I Vittle I Vittle I Vo

Once again they worked so fast they had time left over to play. And so it went day after day. When winter came the ant hill was filled so full it looked like a mountain. At least it did to an ant. Now the ants didn’t have to work anymore. They could sleep late and play all day long.

One cold winter night they heard a knock at their front door. The adult ants answered the door. It was the grasshopper. He was blue with cold and icicles hanging from his fiddle.

“It’s so cold and I’m so hungry,” said the grasshopper.

The adult ants said, “Serves you right for sitting around playing your fiddle all day. You should have been working to prepare for winter.”

But the young ants said, “He was working. He was entertaining us. We wouldn’t have gotten as much work done if it hadn’t been for his fiddling.”

Then they turned to the grasshopper and invited him in to their warm home and gave him food to eat.

The End

This story is inspired by the Aesop’s fable The Ant and the Grasshopper and retold by JB Rowley.

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