Storytelling solutions for those who work with young children

Halloween

Storytelling program for young children. Halloween

1: Story 2: Song 3:Rhyme 4:Activity

The Hobyahs

Once upon a time, creatures of the night, called hobyahs, roamed the Australian bush. Deep in the bush where the hobyahs lurked was a hut made of bark- a humpy. In that humpy lived a little old man and a little old woman. They had a little yellow dingo who was the best guard you could ever hope to find.

One night the Hobyahs came. Out from the gloomy gullies creep, creep, creeping. Through the grey gum-trees; run, run, running. In the ghostly moonlight; skip, skip, skipping on the tips of their toes.

The Hobyahs said, “Hobyah. Hobyah. Hobyah. Pull down the hut, eat up the little old man, and carry off the little old woman.”

But little yellow Dingo knew they were there. He howled and howled and howled. The hobyahs were so frightened they ran home as fast as they could.

The little old man woke up and cried: “I can’t sleep with that Dingo howling all night. If I live through this night I will take off his tail.”

So in the morning the little old man cut off little yellow Dingo’s tail. That night the Hobyahs came again. Out from the gloomy gullies creep, creep, creeping. Through the grey gum-trees; run, run, running. In the ghostly moonlight; skip, skip, skipping on the tips of their toes.

The Hobyahs said, “Hobyah. Hobyah. Hobyah. Pull down the hut, eat up the little old man, and carry off the little old woman.”

But little yellow Dingo knew they were there. He howled and howled and howled. The hobyahs were afraid. They ran home as fast as they could.

The little old man tossed and turned and cried. “I can’t sleep with that Dingo howling. In the morning I’ll cut off one of his legs.”

So in the morning the little old man cut off one of little yellow Dingo’s legs. That night the Hobyahs came again. Out from the gloomy gullies creep, creep, creeping. Through the grey gum-trees; run, run, running. In the ghostly moonlight; skip, skip, skipping on the tips of their toes.

The Hobyahs said, “Hobyah. Hobyah. Hobyah. Pull down the hut, eat up the little old man, and carry off the little old woman.”

But little yellow Dingo knew they were there. He howled and howled and howled. The hobyahs were so frightened they home as fast as they could go.

The little old man tossed in his sleep and cried. “I can’t sleep with that Dingo howling all night. In the morning I will take off the rest of his legs.”

So in the morning the little old man cut off every one of little yellow Dingo’s legs. That night the Hobyahs came again. Out from the gloomy gullies creep, creep, creeping. Through the grey gum-trees; run, run, running. In the ghostly moonlight; skip, skip, skipping on the tips of their toes.

The Hobyahs said, “Hobyah. Hobyah. Hobyah. Pull down the hut, eat up the little old man, and carry off the little old woman.”

But little yellow Dingo knew they were there. He howled and howled and howled. The hobyahs were afraid. They ran home as fast as they could go.

The little old man sat up in his bed and yelled, “That Dingo keeps waking me up with his howling. In the morning I’ll take off his head.”

So in the morning the little old man took off little yellow Dingo’s head. That night the Hobyahs came once more. Out from the gloomy gullies creep, creep, creeping. Through the grey gum-trees; run, run, running. In the ghostly moonlight; skip, skip, skipping on the tips of their toes.

And the hobyahs said: “Hobyah. Hobyah. Hobyah. Pull down the hut, eat up the little old man, and carry off the little old woman.”

Because little yellow Dingo could not howl any more, there was no one to frighten the hobyahs away. They pulled down the hut. They took the little old woman away in a bag. They did not eat up the little old man because he ran away and hid behind a tree.

When the hobyahs arrived home, they hung the bag on a hook. They poked at the bag with their long skinny fingers and cried: “Ha! Ha! Little old woman. A tasty meal you will make.”

But by this time the sun had come up so they went to sleep. Hobyahs, you know, slept all day.

When the little old man found the little old woman gone, he was sorry. Now he knew why little yellow Dingo had been howling at night and he knew what a good guard dog he was. And because this was long ago in the days of magic, the little old man was able to put Dingo back together again. He gave Dingo back his tail, and he put back Dingo’s legs and he put back Dingo’s head.

Dingo was all one piece again. He sniffed the air and picked up the scent of the Hobyahs and went straight to their home deep in the gloomy gully. The hobyahs were fast asleep. Dingo heard the little old woman crying in the bag. He used his teeth to pull the bag open. The little old woman jumped out and ran away as fast as she could. Dingo did not run away. He crept inside the bag to hide. When night came, the hobyahs woke up, and they poked at the bag with their long skinny fingers.

They cried, “Ha! Ha! Little old woman. The time has come to eat you up.”

Out of the bag jumped the little yellow Dingo. He ate up every one of the hobyahs. And that is why there are no hobyahs anymore.

So if you venture out into the Australian bush at night you’ll be safe from Hobyahs… but…keep a careful look-out for other creatures of the night.

Traditional story retold by JB Rowley.

Note to storytellers: Don’t make the mistake of portraying the hobyahs as loud and fierce during the refrain; Hobyah. Hobyah. Hobyah. Pull down the hut, eat up the little old man, and carry off the little old woman.

The hobyahs are planning an ambush and their intended victims are sleeping. Sombre and sinister (or ‘sepulchral monotone’ as S. V. Proudfit puts it) is appropriate here rather than loud and fierce.

The moment for the hobyahs to be loud and fierce is when they are trying to intimidate the woman in the bag – at this point they are in a heightened state, excited about the victory of capture and anticipating the meal ahead.

Song: Five Little Pumpkins

Rhyme: Skin & Bone

There was an old woman all skin and bone
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

She walked thru the graveyard all alone
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

She looked up and she looked down
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

Dead bodies all around
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

The worms crawled here and the worms crawled there
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

Horrible smells filled the air
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

She went to the sexton and to the sexton she said
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

Will I look like that when I am dead?
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

And the sexton to the woman said
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

Yes, you’ll look like that when you are dead
Wooooo ooooo oooooo

And the woman to the sexton said:

YAH!

Activity: Make a string of Jack o’ Lanterns

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Autumn

Storytelling program for young children. Seasons-autumn
1:Story  2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

Story: The Three Little Pigs

Long, long ago in a land where animals could talk, there lived three little pigs. One autumn morning, when the leaves in the trees were turning yellow, they left the farm where they had been born because it was time for them to go out into the world. They said goodbye to each other and went down three different roads.

The first little pig met a man carrying straw. He asked the man for some straw to build a house. The man gave the first little pig a big bundle of straw, and the little pig quickly built himself a house of golden straw.

Then along came a big bad wolf. “Little pig, little pig, let me come in,” he called.

“No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin chin, I’ll not let you in!”

“Ha!” said the big bad wolf, “then I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house in!”

And he huffed and he puffed until the house of straw fell in. The wolf ate the first little pig.

The second little pig was walking along the road when he met a man with a load of sticks. “Please Sir,” he said, “can you let me have some sticks so that I can build a house?”

And the man gave the second little pig a big pile of sticks. The little pig built himself a house of sticks.

Then along came the big bad wolf: “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.”

“No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin chin, I’ll not let you in!”

“Ha!” said the big bad wolf, “then I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house in!”

He huffed and he puffed, and he huffed and he puffed until the house of straw fell in. The wolf ate the second little pig.

The third little pig met a man with a cartload of bricks. “Please sir, can I have some bricks to build myself a house?”

The man gave him some bricks. The third little pig took a long time to build his house because he wanted to make sure it was safe and strong. Not long after he had finished his house, along came the big bad wolf.

“Little pig, little pig, let me come in,” he called.

“No, no, by the hair of my chinny chin chin, I’ll not let you in!”

“Ha!” said the big bad wolf, “then I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house in!”

And he huffed and he puffed, and he huffed and he puffed but the house was strong and did not fall in. So the big bad wolf huffed some more. He huffed and he puffed, and he huffed and he puffed but no matter how much he huffed the house did not fall in. The big bad wolf was angry and he decided he would try to trick the little pig into coming out of his strong brick house.

“Little pig, you are very clever like me. I’d like us to be friends. I tell you what; I know where there are some yummy turnips. I’ll call by tomorrow morning at six o’clock and take you to show you where they are.”

“Thank you, Mr Wolf. Six o’clock will be fine. Do we have to go far?”

The big bad wolf grinned and licked his lips.

“No, my friend, we are only going to the farm by the river. See you at six o’clock.”

But the little pig knew the big bad wolf was not really his friend. The next morning he did not wait until six o’clock. He went to the farm by the river at five o’clock and collected lots of turnips and took them back to his home. The big bad wolf arrived at six o’clock.

“I’ve already been to collect the turnips,” called the little pig.

The wolf was very angry but he pretended not to be. “I am glad, little pig. I hope you enjoy the turnips. I would like to help you even more. I know where there are some delicious red apples just ready to be picked from the tree. I’ll call by tomorrow morning at six o’clock and take you there.”

“Thank you, Mr Wolf. Six o’clock will be fine. Do we have to go far?”

“No, my friend, we are only going to an orchard on top of the hill near the turnip farm. See you at six o’clock.”

Once again the little pig did not wait until six o’clock. The next morning he went to the orchard on top of the hill earlier than six o’clock and even earlier than five o’clock. He went at half past four.

But this time the big bad wolf also went early. He went straight to the orchard at five o’clock. The little pig was still there. He was up in an apple tree. When he saw the wolf he pretended to be pleased to see him.

“I came early to pick some apples for you,” he called. He threw a big juicy apple to the wolf. It landed near the wolf who bent over to pick it up. The little pig quickly jumped into an apple barrel that was under the tree and rolled down the hill in the barrel and along the road to his house of bricks. He rushed inside and bolted the door.

That big bad wolf was so angry he marched down the hill and right up to the little pig’s house of bricks. He climbed up onto the roof and into the chimney.

But the little pig was ready. He had a great big pot of water on the fire. When the wolf dropped down the chimney, he fell into that pot of boiling water.

That big bad wolf was never seen again. The little pig lived in his house happily for many years and often went to get turnips from the turnip farm and apples from the orchard on the hill.

Song: Autumn leaves are falling down

Rhyme: Autumn Song by Katherine Mansfield

Now’s the time when children’s noses
All become as red as roses
And the colour of their faces
Makes me think of orchard places
Where the juicy apples grow,
And tomatoes in a row.

Activity: Make an autumn leaf

The body

Pre-school Storytelling Program : The body

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

Story: Little Red Riding Hood

Once upon a time, there was a little girl called Little Red Riding Hood. She always wore a red cloak with a hood. That is why she was called Little Red Riding Hood.

One day, Little Red Riding Hood decided to visit her grandmother. She loved to visit Grandma because Grandma told her lots of stories. Grandma lived just across the park from Little Red Riding Hood’s house. Her mother let her go on her own because it was only a short walk.

Her mother said, “Go straight to Grandma’s house.”

“I will, Mother.”

“Do not talk to strangers on the way,” said her mother.

“I won’t, Mother. I promise.”

Little Red Riding Hood skipped along the path. Some of her neighbours were picnicking in the park. Little Red Riding Hood waved to them as she went past. Then she met a wolf. The wolf pretended to be nice.

“Where are you going, pretty little girl?” he said.

“I’m on my way to see Grandma who lives on the other side of the park.”

The wolf smiled and licked his lips. Little Red Riding Hood continued on her way but she did not know what the wolf was planning. He took a shortcut across the park and got to Grandma’s house before Little Red Riding Hood.

Grandma had left the door unlocked for Grandpa who had gone for a walk.  The wolf walked right into Grandma’s house. When Grandma saw the wolf, she screamed and fainted. The wolf dragged her into the bathroom and locked the door. Poor Grandma.

Then the wolf put on one of Grandma’s nighties, pulled one of her frilly night caps over his head and climbed into Grandma’s bed.

A few minutes later, Little Red Riding Hood knocked on the door.

“Who is it?” called the wolf, trying to sound like Grandma.

“It’s me, Little Red Riding Hood.”

“Let yourself in dear,” croaked the wolf. “I’m in bed sick today.”

When Little Red Riding Hood went inside, she knew her grandma must be very sick because she looked so different.

“Grandma, you must be very sick.”

“I am, dear.”

“Grandma!  What a strange voice you have.”

“Oh, I have a sore throat,” said the wolf, adding a cough at the end.

“Grandma!  What big ears you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood, going closer to the bed.

“All the better to hear you with, my dear,” said the wolf.

“And Grandma!  What big eyes you have.”

“All the better to see you with, my dear.”

“And Grandma!  What big teeth you have.”

“All the better to eat you with,” roared the wolf. Then he jumped out of the bed and chased Little Red Riding Hood.

Little Red Riding Hood ran as fast as her little legs could carry her. She ran out the door and shouted.

“Help!  Wolf!”

Just at that moment, Grandpa came back from his walk. He picked up a big stick and chased that hungry wolf away.

Little Red Riding Hood and Grandpa found Grandma in the bathroom. Grandpa waved some smelling salts under her nose to wake her up.

“Oh Grandma, are you all right,” said Little Red Riding Hood, putting her arms around her grandmother.

“I’m fine now, dear,” said Grandma.

“I’m sorry, Grandma,” said Little Red Riding Hood. “I met the wolf in the park but I should not have spoken to him.”

“No, my dear child, you should not speak to strangers in the park,” said Grandma.

They sat at the kitchen table and Grandpa made them all a nice cup of tea.

Now,” said Grandma to Little Red Riding Hood, giving her a kiss on the cheek.  “I have a new story to tell you.” Grandma took a sip of her tea and began the story.

“Once upon a time there was a big bad wolf who met a little girl in the park called Little Red Riding Hood.”

And that is how the story of Little Red Riding Hood began long, long ago.

This ‘gentle’ version of the well known story is a retelling by JB Rowley – free for use by others in any way other than commercial publication.

Song: Head and shoulders, knees and toes  (cute youtube video) and at KIDiddles


Rhyme:

Ten little fingers, ten little toes,
Two little ears and one little nose
Two little eyes that shine so bright
And one little mouth to kiss me goodnight.


Activity:

Several activities to choose from here:

Wriggly Things

Pre-school Storytelling Program: Wriggly Things

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

Story: The Very Hungry Spider

One day when I was  little,  I sat under a gum tree in the garden. A ladybird came to play with me. We played for a little while and then along came another garden creature. A caterpillar came to play with me and the ladybird.

We played for a little while and then along came another garden creature. A butterfly came to play with me and the ladybird and the caterpillar.

We played for a little while and then along came another garden creature. A snail came to play with me and the ladybird and the caterpillar and the butterfly.

We played for a little while and then along came another garden creature. A dragonfly came to play with me and the ladybird, the caterpillar, the butterfly and the snail.

We played for a little while and then along came another garden creature. It was a big black hungry spider!

The spider went very close to the dragonfly. The dragonfly was frightened and flew away.

The spider was still hungry and went very close to the snail. The snail was frightened and crawled away as fast as it could.

The spider was still hungry and went very close to the butterfly. The butterfly was frightened and flew away.

The spider was still hungry and went very close to the caterpillar. The caterpillar was frightened and crawled away as fast as it could.

The spider was still hungry and went very close to the ladybird. The ladybird flew away home.

The spider was still hungry so it made a web between the two branches in the gum tree. The spider waited for a fly to get caught in its web but I went inside to tell my mummy about all the wriggly creatures I had seen in the garden.

This is an original story by JB Rowley free for use by others in any way other than commercial publication. I tell the story as an ‘apron story’ using cardboard cutouts of the various creatures which I attach to the apron with velcro as I tell the story.


Song: Buzzy Bee


Rhyme: Little Miss Muffet

Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet
Eating her curds and whey,
Along came a spider,
Who sat down beside her
And frightened Miss Muffet away

Activity: Colour in a snail.

Family

Pre-school Storytelling Program: Family

1:Story  2:Song 3:Rhyme   4:Activity

Story: The Three Bears
Once upon a time there were three bears: a Little, Small, Wee Bear, a Mummy Bear and a Daddy Bear. They lived together in a house in the forest.

Early one morning Little, Small, Wee Bear, Mummy Bear and Daddy Bear went for a walk in the forest while they waited for their porridge to cool. A little girl called Goldilocks came to the house of the three bears. She looked through the window. She peeped through the keyhole. She pushed the door open and went inside.

She saw three bowls of porridge on the table. She took a spoonful from the Daddy Bear’s bowl but it was too hot. She took a spoonful from Mummy Bear’s bowl but it was too sweet. She took a spoonful from Little, Small, Wee Bear’s bowl and it was just right. She ate up all the porridge.

Goldilocks was tired so she decided to sit down. She sat in Daddy Bear’s chair but it was too wide. She sat in Mummy Bear’s chair but it was too narrow. She sat in Little, Small, Wee Bear’s chair and it was just right but she was too heavy and the chair broke.

Goldilocks was still tired so she went into the next room which was the bedroom of the three bears. There was a big, huge, enormous bed for Daddy Bear and Mummy Bear and a little, small, wee bed for Little, Small, Wee Bear. Goldilocks snuggled into the big, huge, enormous bed but it was too large. Goldilocks snuggled into the little, small, wee bed and it was just right. She fell fast asleep.

Goldilocks was still asleep when Little, Small, Wee Bear, Mummy Bear and Daddy Bear came home.

Daddy Bear said, “Someone has been eating my porridge.”

Mummy Bear said, “Someone has been eating my porridge.”

Little, Small, Wee Bear said, “Someone has been eating my porridge and it’s all gone.”

Daddy Bear said, “Someone has been sitting in my chair.”

Mummy Bear said, “Someone has been sitting in my chair.”

Little, Small, Wee Bear said, “Someone has been sitting in my chair and it’s all broken.”

Daddy Bear, Mummy Bear and Little, Small, Wee Bear went into the bedroom. Mummy Bear and Daddy Bear said, “Someone has been sleeping in our bed.”

Little, Small, Wee Bear said, “Someone has been sleeping in my bed and she’s still here.”

That’s when Goldilocks woke up. When she saw Little, Small, Wee Bear, Mummy Bear and Daddy Bear staring at her, she got such a fright she jumped out of the bed, out of the window and out of the house.

The three bears never saw Goldilocks again.

Baby Bumble bee

Rhyme: Clap hands
Clap hands, clap hands till Daddy comes home
till Daddy comes home, till Daddy comes home
Clap hands, clap hands till Daddy comes home
With an ice cream cone

Clap hands, clap hands till Mummy comes home
till Mummy comes home, till Mummy comes home
Clap hands, clap hands till Mummy comes home
With an ice cream cone

Activity:

Make a family tree

 

Posted by JB Rowley: teller of stories, writer of books and teacher of English.

Spring

Storytelling program for young children. Seasons-spring
1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

 Story: The Wattle Fairies

Once upon a time in Australia there lived beautiful fairies with golden curls. They lived at the bottom of the huge tree ferns in the rainforest. They came out only at night when the moon was shining. They danced in the moonlight. They danced and danced and danced. But one night, it was early spring when the weather starts to get warmer after the winter cold, a dark cloud came over the moon. The little fairies with the golden curls could not see their way home. They decided to climb one of the very tall trees. Perhaps they could see their path if looked down from the top of a tree. So they climbed one of the tall trees and when they reached the top they ran along the branches. Just at that moment they heard a big booming voice.

“Who is in my tree?”

The little golden fairies trembled in fear. They all looked down. There at the base of the tree stood a fearsome bunyip. The bunyip repeated his question in his big booming voice.

“Who is in my tree?”

The little fairies called out in their tiny voices. “We are sorry Mr Bunyip. We didn’t know it was your tree. We are just trying to find our way home.”

“I don’t want your excuses,” said the bunyip. “This is my tree and you should not be here!”

“Sorry, Mr Bunyip.”

“Sorry is not good enough.”

The bunyip stamped his foot in anger.

“Fine,” he said. “If you like my tree so much you can stay here…FOREVER!”

The little fairies shook with fear and when they tried to move they found they were stuck to the tree. They couldn’t get away. That bunyip must have had some magic powers.

The little golden fairies pleaded with the bunyip.

“Please let us go, Mr Bunyip. We promise we will never climb your tree ever again.”

The bunyip stamped his foot and grunted.

“All right,” he said. “I’ll give you a fair chance. If you can answer my question I’ll let you go. And what’s more I’ll give you three chances to answer. Can’t say fairer than that now can I?”

“Yes. Mr Bunyip. That’s fair. You are very kind indeed. What is the question we must answer?”

“It’s very simple. What is it that is on the other side of the tree, looking up at you?’

The little golden fairies bent their heads and looked down but it was too dark and they were too high up to be able to see the ground below.

“Well?” said the bunyip.

“Well,” said one golden fairy. “Is it a wombat?”

The bunyip looked up at the little fairy and stamped his foot.

“Wrong! You have two guesses left.”

Another golden fairy tried to answer the question.

“Is it a lyre bird?”

The bunyip looked up at the little fairy and stamped his foot.

“Wrong! You have one guess left. If you do not answer my question you will stay in this tree forever!”

The little golden fairies could not think what it might be.

“Well?” said the bunyip.

One brave little fairy called out an answer.

“Is it a skink?”

The bunyip looked up at the little fairy and stamped his foot.

“Wrong! You will stay in this tree forever!”

The bunyip stomped off into the bush.

The little golden fairies were very sad but they had no choice. They had to stay in the tree. They stayed all night. Then in the morning when the sun came up they all bent their little golden heads to look down at the bottom of the tree to see what it was that was looking up at them. To their surprise they saw their own little faces looking back up at them because on that side of the tree was a beautiful clear stream and their faces were reflected in the water. The little fairies with the golden curls were very happy. It was the first time they had seen their own faces and they quite liked it. After that they decided they liked being high up in the tree. And that is where they are today; still up in the tree clinging to the branches because they are the wattle fairies.

And if you go out to the bush or even into the park and look at a wattle tree you’ll see the little golden wattle fairies still there, still looking down at the ground below.

A story by JB Rowley adapted from a story in the  Grade Two Victorian School Reader . Free for use by others in any way other than commercial publication.

Rig a Jig Jig

As I was walking down the street,
Down the street, down the street,
A friend of mine I chanced to meet,
Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho!
Rig-a-jig-jig and away we go,
Away we go, away we go,
Rig-a-jig-jig and away we go,
Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho!

http://www.songsforteaching.com/folk/rigajigjig.php

Rhyme: Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle shells,
And pretty maids all in a row.

Activity 1: Ask children to change the last sentence of Mary, Mary Quite Contrary by adding their own rhyme

Activity 2: Ask some children to retell the story

Pre-School Storytelling Program: Colours

1: Story 2: Song  3: rhyme 4: Activity

Story: How Parrots Got Their Colours.

Long, long ago in Australia lived a white bird. White Bird did not want to be white. She wanted to be colourful.

One day Sooty Owl, one of the other birds in the bush, lost an egg. Sooty Owl had to stay in her nest and look after the egg that was still there so she called for the other birds to help her find the lost egg.

Kookaburra shook her head. Magpie shook her head. Cockatoo shook her head. But White Bird flew through the trees to Sooty Owl.

“I will help you look for your lost egg,” she said.

White Bird flew to the ground and walked around the tree. She searched and searched but could not find the lost egg. Then she scratched underneath a big leaf. There was the egg. She it picked up with her claws and took it back to Sooty Owl. Sooty Owl was very happy.

Kookaburra cackled. Magpie warbled. Cockatoo squawked.

Then Sooty Owl told White Bird about a secret lake called the lake of many colours.

“If you go there and bathe in the lake,” she said to White Bird, “you will become a bird of many colours.”

So White Bird flew to the lake of many colours. When she came back to the bush she had become the Rainbow Lorikeet.

An original story by JB Rowley. Free for use by others in any way other than commercial publication.

Rhyme: The Bunch of Blue Ribbons

Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
Johnny’s so long at the fair.

He promised he’d buy me a bunch of blue ribbons,
He promised he’d buy me a bunch of blue ribbons,
He promised he’d buy me a bunch of blue ribbons,
To tie up my bonny brown hair.

Song: Sing a Rainbow

http://kids.niehs.nih.gov/games/songs/childrens/singarainbowmid.htm

Activity: Colour in the Rainbow Lorikeet

http://printablecolouringpages.co.uk/?s=lorikeet

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