Storytelling solutions for those who work with young children

Posts tagged ‘JB Rowley’

The Laugh

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

The Laugh

Near Uluru in the heart of Australia, children played in the shade of a gum tree. The children laughed as they played. Their laughter floated north across the hot sandy deserts and all the way to Darwin.

Children playing in the school yards in Darwin heard the laugh. They began to laugh too. Soon all the children in Darwin were laughing.

The laugh became bigger and bigger. It travelled south along the west coast of Australia, all the way to Perth.

Children playing in the school yards in Perth heard the laugh. One by one they began to laugh. Soon all the children in Perth were laughing.

The laugh was becoming bigger and bigger. It travelled east across the Nullabor plain to Adelaide.

Children playing in the school yards in Adelaide heard the laugh. They began to laugh too. Soon all the children in Adelaide were laughing.

The laugh floated across the Southern Ocean to Hobart.

Children playing in the school yards in Hobart heard the laugh. One by one they began to laugh. Soon all the children in Hobart were laughing.

The laugh travelled across the Bass Strait to Melbourne. The winds blew some of it away. But one little girl heard it. She was sitting in a school yard alone under a gum tree.

Annie used to live in the bush and had just moved to Melbourne. She was very shy. The other children teased her because she was different. Her clothes were different and she spoke differently because bush ways were different from city ways.

The other children did not hear the laugh because they were playing noisy games.

The laugh floated closer to Annie and the leaves in the gum tree began to tremble. Annie looked up. The tree seemed to be laughing! Then one of the slender green leaves dropped from the tree and landed in front of Annie. It lay on the ground shaking. It shook and shook until it grew bigger and bigger. As it grew bigger it took on a shape. There in front of Annie was a large green coolamon!

Annie knew what a coolamon was because she had seen Aboriginal women near her family’s sheep station carrying them on their backs filled with wild berries. Sometimes they carried their babies in the coolamons.

Annie stepped into the coolamon and sat down. As soon as she did the coolamon lifted off the ground and up into the sky! Far below her Annie could see the kids playing in the school yard and the teachers standing near the fence. No one noticed her flying through the sky. The coolamon rose higher and higher until she could see the tops of the houses. Then she saw rivers and trees and kangaroos and emus bounding across the plains.

Finally she saw the big red rock called Uluru, and she heard children laughing. The coolamon landed gently on the ground right under the tree where the children were laughing. When they saw Annie in the coolamon they beckoned her to join them.

The children were all dark skinned, dark haired and dark eyed. Annie was fair skinned with blond hair and blue eyes. But she didn’t feel different at all.

“Why are you laughing?” Annie asked.

The children shrugged their shoulders and looked at each other. They couldn’t remember why they were laughing. Then the giggles rippled up into their throats again and spilled out into the clear desert air. Annie felt the laughter swelling inside until she was laughing too. She laughed and laughed.

Later, the coolamon took Annie back to Melbourne. It landed in the school yard under the tree where her journey began. When she stepped out, the green coolamon began to shrink. Slowly it became a slender green leaf once more.
Annie was still laughing. She forgot about her shyness and ran toward the other children. They stopped their games and looked at her. Her laughter made them laugh too. Soon they were all laughing together.

Annie looked back at the tree where she had sat alone and sad for so long. She saw the slender green leaves begin to tremble and she knew the laugh was starting another journey.

An original story by JB Rowley free for others to use except for commercial publication.

Song: Native Animal Song (Use the link. Scroll down on right.)

Rhyme: Coolamon Song lyrics (This can be used as a rhyme – great action rhyme)

Activity: Dot painting for kids.

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Fable

1:Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

 The Dingo, the Rooster and the Fox

Once there was a rooster that lived on a farm. Rooster wanted to see the big wide world so one day he left the farm yard. He walked along a winding road until he came to the bush. He started along the bush track and met Dingo.

“What are you doing way out here in the bush?” said Dingo. “You are a farm bird.”

Rooster explained that he was tired of the farm and wanted to see the big wide world.

“Well,” said Dingo, “I’d better come with you. It is too dangerous here in the bush for you on your own. Don’t you know there are hungry red foxes in this bush?”

Rooster didn’t know that and he was glad to have Dingo as a friend. So Dingo and Rooster walked along the bush track together. That night they found a hollow tree to sleep in. Dingo crept inside the tree. Rooster flew up onto one of the branches.

At dawn Rooster woke up just like he did on the farm. He stood up and flapped his wings and crowed loudly just like he did on the farm. But instead of waking up the farmer, he woke up a red fox. The fox ran to the tree where the rooster was.

“Welcome to the bush, beautiful bird,” said the fox. “You have a fine voice. I would like to be your friend.”

Rooster knew that the fox really wanted to eat him but he pretended to be friendly, just like the fox.

“That is a very kind welcome Mr Fox,” said Rooster. “I would like to be your friend too. If you go to the door of my house, my servant will let you in.”

The fox licked his lips at the thought of catching the rooster and eating it. He crept around the tree.

Unfortunately for the fox, Dingo was waiting for him.

That was the end of the fox.

A retelling of the Aesop’s fable (The Dog, the Rooster and the Fox), by JB Rowley. Free for others to use except for commercial publication.

Song:

Good Morning Mr Rooster

Rhyme: Dingo, Dingo

Dingo, dingo, where have you been?
“I’ve been to Sydney to visit Aunt Jean.”
Dingo, Dingo, what did you do there?
“I gave a little fox a might big scare!”

Activity:

Make a crowing rooster

Christmas

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

The Special Donkey

Once upon a time there was a little donkey who was the saddest donkey in the world. He spent all day alone in a big paddock. No friends came to visit him.

One day a man called Joseph saw the little donkey and felt sorry for him. He needed a donkey for a special job so he chose the lonely donkey.

“I have an important job for you.”

Little Donkey was very excited. Nobody had ever been nice to him before. He liked Joseph. Joseph took Little Donkey home to meet his wife Mary who had a baby growing inside her.

Joseph put his hand on her round belly and said to Little Donkey, “We have to go to Bethlehem but Mary cannot walk all the way with a baby inside her. I want you to carry Mary to Bethlehem.”

Little Donkey said, “Hee Haw!”

So they set off on their long journey. Mary rode on Little Donkey. Joseph walked along beside them. They travelled slowly and when they got to Bethlehem it was already night time. Lots of other people got there first so there was nowhere to stay. All the inns were full.

Every time Joseph knocked on a door and asked for a room the innkeeper said, “Go away. We do not have any rooms.”

When they came to the very last inn, Joseph was exhausted and Mary was very tired.  Joseph knocked on the door of the inn.

“We have no room!” the innkeeper shouted.

“But my wife needs somewhere to lie down,” said Joseph. “Her baby wants to come out.”

But the man slammed the door and told them to go away. That’s when Little Donkey started to make a lot of noise. He stamped his foot and he brayed.

“Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw!”

The innkeeper stuck his head out of a window and told Joseph to keep Little Donkey quiet.

“That donkey will wake every one up,” he said.

And Joseph said, “He will not stop unless he can sleep somewhere. You know how stubborn donkeys are.”

“All right, all right,” said the innkeeper. “You can all sleep in the stable if you keep the donkey quiet.”

So they went to the stable and Joseph helped Mary off Little Donkey’s back and she lay down on a bed of straw. And she was just in time because the little baby inside her wanted to come out.  Joseph and Mary called the baby Jesus and Joseph thanked Little Donkey for helping them.

“You are a very special little donkey,” he said.

And Little Donkey said, “Hee Haw!”


Where is Santa (to the tune of Frère Jacques)

Where is Santa,     (Hand above right eye as if looking for Santa.)
where is Santa      (Repeat previous action using left eye.)
With his sack,       (Both hands over right shoulder as if holding a sack.)
with his sack        (Repeat previous action over left shoulder.)
Coming down the chimney.    (Hold both hands up to the right and bring them down with fingers fluttering.)
Coming down the chimney. (Repeat previous action on left hand side.)
Ding dang dong. Ding dang dong. (Thump fists on top of each other.)


Five Jolly Santas

Five jolly santas standing near a van
One ran away frightened by a man
Then there were four

Four jolly santas dancing round a lake
One ran away frightened by a snake
The there were three

Three jolly santas munching on a carrot
One ran away frightened by a parrot
Then there were two

Two jolly santas jumping in a box
One ran away frightened by a fox
Then there was one

One jolly santa standing all alone
So he whistled up his reindeer and galloped off home.

Paper Chains

Make paper chains to decorate the Christmas tree.

Turtles

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

Little Lost Turtle

One day Mummy Turtle came out of the ocean and onto the beach. She dug a big hole in the sand and laid her eggs in it. She covered the hole with sand so that no other animals could find her nest. Then she went back into the ocean.

After many days the eggs began to hatch. Lots of little baby turtles crawled out of the sand and went to the ocean. But one little turtle got lost. Instead of going into the sea, he went into the bush. He was scared. He couldn’t find his mummy.

He called, “Mummy! Mummy!”

But his mummy was in the ocean and couldn’t hear him. All around him were big tall trees and he heard strange noises. Poor Little Baby Turtle; he was so frightened. He kept walking through the bush and looking for his mummy. He met a furry animal with short legs.

Little baby turtle cried, “Are you my mummy?”

But the furry animal with short legs shook her head. “I’m not a turtle. I’m a wombat,” she said.

Little Baby Turtle cried and cried. “I want my mummy!”

He kept walking through the bush. Soon he saw an animal with a black nose and round ears. It was half asleep in a tree.

“Are you my mummy?” called Little Baby Turtle.

The animal with the black nose and round ears shook her head. “I’m not a turtle. I’m a koala,” she said.

Little Baby Turtle cried and cried. “I want my mummy!”

He kept walking and on a riverbank he saw an animal with a beak like a duck and a tail like a paddle.

“Are you my mummy?” called Little Baby Turtle.

The animal with a beak like a duck and a tail like a paddle shook her head. “I’m not a turtle. I’m a platypus,” she said.

Little Baby Turtle cried and cried. “I want my mummy!”

He kept on walking but he was soon too tired to walk any further so he curled up under a rock and went to sleep.

Meanwhile out in the ocean, Mummy Turtle was counting the baby turtles to make sure they had all arrived. That’s when she realised one of her little babies was missing. She swam out of the ocean and walked up along the sand to the place where she had buried her eggs. She saw lots of tiny turtle footprints in the sand, all going into the ocean. But she saw one set of tiny turtle footprints going into the bush so she followed those footprints. When she got into the bush she could not see the turtle footprints any more but she saw Wombat.

“Which way did my baby go?” said Mummy Turtle.

Wombat grunted and pointed one short leg in the direction Little Baby Turtle had gone.

“Thank you,” said Mummy Turtle and hurried off.

Soon she saw Koala sleeping in the tree and called to her. “Which way did my baby go?”

Koala opened her sleepy eyes and jerked her head in the direction that Little Baby Turtle had gone.

“Thank you,” said Mummy Turtle and hurried off.

Soon she saw Platypus swimming in the river and called out to her. “Which way did my baby go?”

Platypus turned around and flipped her tail in the direction Little Baby Turtle had gone.

“Thank you,” said Mummy Turtle and hurried off.

By this time Little Baby Turtle had woken up and was walking back through the bush tired and sad. Then he saw a strange animal with a shell on its back coming towards him.

Little Baby Turtle ran to the animal and cried, “Are you my mummy?”

“Yes,” cried his mother. “I’m Mummy Turtle.”

And Mummy Turtle and Little Baby Turtle hugged each other for a long time.

An original story by JB Rowley inspired by Are You My Mother?  Free for others to use except for commercial publication.

 

Song: I Had a Little Turtle

Rhyme:

There was a little turtle   (Make fist like turtle)
That lived in the sea  (Draw waves in the air)
He swam through the waves  (Pretend to swim)
And climbed on the rocks   (Walk fingers across child’s hair)

He snapped at a jelly fish   (Make snapping motion at child’s hand)
And he snapped at the sea   (Make snapping motion at child’s tummy)
He snapped at a crayfish   (Make snapping motion at child’s foot)
And he snapped at me   (Snap at yourself)

He caught the little jelly fish   (Tickle child’s hand)
And he caught the angry sea   (Tickle child’s tummy)
He caught the crayfish   (Tickle child’s foot)
But he didn’t catch me !!!!

 

Activity: Colour in a Sea Turtle

Halloween 2

1:Story  2: Rhyme

The Ghost With One Black Eye

One morning Mother, Father, Brother and Sister were sitting at the breakfast table and Baby was sitting in her high chair when Baby cried: “I want my apple juice.”

Big sister said, “I’ll get your apple juice.”

The apple juice was in the cellar downstairs. Big Sister went down the stairs. The stairs creaked. She opened the door. The door screeched. She walked across the room to the cupboard where the apple juice was kept.

Just as she was about to open the cupboard a voice from inside said, “I AM THE GHOST WITH ONE BLACK EYE.”

Big Sister ran back upstairs.

Baby cried, “I want my apple juice.”

“Mum,” said Big Sister. “Can someone else please get the apple juice?”

Big Brother said, “You’re just scared cos it’s dark down there. I’ll get the apple juice. I’m not scared of anything.”

Big Brother went down the stairs. The stairs creaked. He opened the door. The door screeched. He walked across the room to the cupboard where the apple juice was kept.

Just as he was about to open the cupboard a voice from inside said, “I AM THE GHOST WITH ONE BLACK EYE.”

Big Brother ran back upstairs.

Baby cried, “I want my apple juice.”

“Oh Mum,” said Big Brother. “I just remembered. I gotta do my homework. I gotta do all my homework straight away. Homework is very important, Mum. Someone else will have to get the apple juice.”

Hm, thought his mother. Why are the kids so scared of going into the cellar?

Mum went down the stairs. The stairs creaked. She opened the door. The door screeched. She walked across the room to the cupboard where the apple juice was kept.

Just as she was about to open the cupboard a voice from inside said, “I AM THE GHOST WITH ONE BLACK EYE.”

Mum ran back upstairs.

Baby cried, “I want my apple juice.”

Mum said to Dad, “Could you get the apple juice please, dear?”

Dad went down the stairs. The stairs creaked. He opened the door. The door screeched. He walked across the room to the cupboard where the apple juice was kept.

Just as he was about to open the cupboard a voice from inside said, “I AM THE GHOST WITH ONE BLACK EYE.”

Dad ran back upstairs.

Baby cried, “I want my apple juice.”

Dad said, “Why don’t you have some milk?”

Baby cried, “I want my apple juice.”

And she climbed out of her high chair, hitched up her nappy and went down the stairs. The stairs creaked. Baby pushed open the door. The door screeched. She toddled across the room to the cupboard where the apple juice was kept.

Just as she was about to open the cupboard a voice from inside said, “I AM THE GHOST WITH ONE BLACK EYE.”

Baby opened the cupboard door and shouted, “IF YOU DON’T LET ME HAVE MY APPLE JUICE, YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE TWO BLACK EYES!”

The ghost disappeared and was never heard from again.

(I first heard this story told by fellow storyteller, Edward Faraci, who had his audience enthralled.)

Witch Poem
The witch came back from a cemetery plot
and brought me a big black pot (stir)
The witch came back from a haunted house
and brought me a wriggling mouse (hold at arm’s length)
The witch came back from a misty swamp
and brought me bugs to stomp (stamp foot)
The witch came back from a ghostly hollow
and brought me worms to swallow (hold imaginary worm over open mouth)
The witch came back from a magic shop
and said this poem has got to STOP! (clap)

(I don’t remember where I sourced this poem from originally.)

More resources for Halloween here.

This blog is brought to you by JB Rowley.

Bedtime

1: Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme 4: Activity

The Creaky Door

Once there was a little boy who loved to visit his grandmother who lived on a farm. Grandma had a ginger cat called Ginger, a red dog called Red, a baby pig called Babe and a woolly sheep called Woolly.

One day the little boy had a wonderful time on Grandma’s farm. He played with Ginger the cat, walked Red the dog, fed Babe the pig and rode on Woolly the sheep. After he had done all these things he had a bath and a big dinner.

“Time for bed,” said Grandma.

They went upstairs to the room with the big bouncy bed. The little boy climbed under the soft warm doona and Grandma sang him a lullaby.

Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
Hush, now, don’t you cry
Ah, Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
It’s an Irish lullaby

She kissed him goodnight and waited till he was asleep, then she turned off the light and closed the door. The door went creeeeeeeeek.

The little boy woke up. “Grandma, I’m scared. I don’t want to stay here all by myself. Can Ginger sleep with me?”

“All right,” said Grandma. “Just this once I’ll let you have the cat in the bed with you.”

So she went downstairs, picked up Ginger the cat, and went back upstairs and put the ginger cat in the bed with the little boy. Ginger snuggled up under the doona. The little boy settled back down under the soft warm doona and closed his eyes. Grandma sang the little boy a lullaby.

Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
Hush, now, don’t you cry
Ah, Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
It’s an Irish lullaby

She kissed him goodnight and waited till he was asleep, then she turned off the light and closed the door. The door went creeeeeek.

The little boy woke up. “Grandma, I’m scared.”

The cat said, “Meooow!”

The little boy said, “We’re scared, Grandma. Can Red sleep with us?”

“All right,” said Grandma. “Just this once I’ll let you have the dog in the bed with you.”

So she went downstairs and whistled for Red the dog to follow her. Then she went back upstairs and put the red dog in the bed with the little boy and the ginger cat. Red snuggled up to Ginger and Ginger snuggled up to the little boy who settled back down under the soft warm doona and closed his eyes. Grandma sang the little boy a lullaby.

Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
Hush, now, don’t you cry
Ah, Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
It’s an Irish lullaby

She kissed him goodnight and waited till he was asleep, then she turned off the light and closed the door. The door went creeeeeek.

The little boy woke up. “Grandma, I’m scared.”

The cat said, “Meooow!”

The dog said, “Woof!”

The little boy said, “We’re scared, Grandma. Can Babe sleep with us?”

“All right,” said Grandma. “Just this once I’ll let you have the pig in the bed with you.”

So she went downstairs to the barn, picked up Babe the pig, went back upstairs and put the baby pig in the bed with the little boy and the ginger cat and the red dog. Babe snuggled up to Red, Red snuggled up to Ginger and Ginger snuggled up to the little boy who settled back down under the soft warm doona and closed his eyes. Grandma sang the little boy a lullaby.

Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
Hush, now, don’t you cry
Ah, Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
It’s an Irish lullaby

She kissed him goodnight and waited till he was asleep, then she turned off the light and closed the door. The door went creeeeeek.

The little boy woke up. “Grandma, I’m scared.”

The cat said, “Meooow!”

The dog said, “Woof!”

The pig said, “Oink!”

The little boy said, “We’re scared, Grandma. Can Woolly sleep with us?”

“All right,” said Grandma. “Just this once I’ll let you have the sheep in the bed with you.”

So she went down stairs and out to the barn and led woolly the sheep into the house and upstairs and put it in the bed with the little boy and the ginger cat and the red dog and the baby pig. Woolly snuggled up to Babe, Babe snuggled up to Red, Red snuggled up to Ginger and Ginger snuggled up to the little boy who settled back down under the doona and closed his eyes. Grandma sang the little boy a lullaby.

Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
Hush, now, don’t you cry
Ah, Toora, loora, loora
Toora, loora, lie
Toora, loora, loora
It’s an Irish lullaby

She kissed him goodnight and waited till he was asleep, then she turned off the light and…just as she was about to close the door, she had an idea. Grandma went downstairs and got her special creaky door oil. She went back upstairs and dripped oil on the hinges of the creaky bedroom door. Then she closed the door…very quietly.

And the little boy and the ginger cat and the red dog and the baby pig and the woolly sheep slept all night long.

 

Song: Toora Loora

 

Rhyme: Little Boy Blue

Little Boy Blue come blow your horn
The sheep’s in the meadow, the cow’s in the corn;
Where is the boy who looks after the sheep?
He’s under the haystack, fast asleep.
Will you wake him? No, not I,
For if I do, he’s sure to cry.


Activity:
Farm Crafts

Posted by JB Rowley: teller of stories, writer of books and teacher of English.

Bread

1:Story 2: Song 3: Rhyme   4: Activity


The Fairy Bread Man

One day Grandma was making fairy bread for her grandchildren. They loved fairy bread. Grandma spread the butter on the pieces of bread and pressed the bread onto a plate of hundreds and thousands. Then she cut the colourful bread up into triangles just the way the children like them. She decided to make special fairy bread for herself. Instead of cutting the bread with a knife she used a cutter in the shape of a little man and she made a fairy bread man. With the hundreds and thousands all over his body he was a very colourful fairy bread man. Then Grandma piped on some icing to give him two eyes, a nose and a mouth. He looked so real she thought he might get up and walk. And that’s just what he did.

He jumped up off the table and yelled. “You’re not going to eat me you greedy old woman.”

Grandma got a fright. But she grabbed her rolling pin and ran after Fairy Bread Man.
“Who are you calling a greedy old woman?” she yelled.

Fairy Bread Man said:
Greedy old woman, greedy old woman.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me, I’m the fairy bread man.

Grandma ran after him, waving her rolling pin in the air.
“You come back here. Don’t you dare disappear.”

Grandma ran as fast as she could but she couldn’t catch him.

Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Wombat heard Fairy Bread Man singing.

“I love fairy bread,” said Wombat. “I’m sick of eating grass. Come back here Fairy Bread Man.”

Fairy Bread Man laughed:
I can run away from you, Wombat,
I can run as fast as a panther cat.
Run, run as fast as you can,
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Wombat ran as fast as he could but he couldn’t catch him.

Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Emu heard Fairy Bread Man singing.

“I love fairy bread,” said Emu. “I’m sick of eating seeds. Come back here Fairy Bread Man.”

Fairy Bread Man laughed:
I can run away from you, Emu.
Even if you flew, I could run away from you.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Emu ran as fast as she could but she couldn’t catch him. Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Kangaroo heard Fairy Bread Man singing.

“I love fairy bread,” said Kangaroo. “I’m sick of eating plants. Come back here Fairy Bread Man.”

Fairy Bread Man laughed:
I can run away from you, Kangaroo.
I can run away from a zoo if I want to.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.

Kangaroo hopped as fast as he could but he couldn’t catch him.

Fairy Bread Man laughed and skipped and danced and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

By now Fairy Bread Man thought he was very clever. He was sure he could run faster than anything on land. He skipped through the bush singing his song.

When he saw a dingo resting under a tree he stopped and sang:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

The dingo took no notice. In fact it looked like the dingo did not even hear Fairy Bread Man.

Fairy Bread Man sang a little louder.
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

Still the dingo took no notice.

Fairy Bread Man went a little closer to the dingo and sang again:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m the fairy bread man.
You can’t catch me; nobody can.

Still the dingo took no notice.

Finally, Fairy Bread Man went right up to the dingo and sang into his ear:
Run, run as fast as you can
You can’t catch me; I’m…

But before he could finish his cheeky song – SNAP! The dingo ate him up in one bite. There was not a single crumb left over.

An original story by JB Rowley  inspired by The Gingerbread Man. Free for others to use except for commercial publication.

Song: Bread and Butter Song

Rhyme: Slice, Slice

Slice, slice, the bread looks nice.
(Using side of hand, rub sideways on child’s tummy.)
Spread, spread butter on the bread.
(Use palm of hand to rub child’s tummy.)
Jam on top makes it sweet.
(Kiss child’s tummy.)
Now it’s good for me to eat.
(Tickle child’s tummy.)

Activity: Make Fairy Bread

What you need:
Slices of white sandwich bread
Butter/margarine at room temperature
Multi-coloured hundred and thousands

Procedure:
Spread the slices of bread evenly with butter.
Cut the bread into triangles or use a cutter to make different shapes (without the crusts). (Children love doing this bit.)
Place the hundreds and thousands on a plate.
Press the bread butter side down into the hundreds and thousands to coat the bread.
Enjoy.

Posted by JB Rowley: teller of stories, writer of books and teacher of English.

 

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